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Article
March 1943

TREATMENT OF ACUTE ARTERIAL OCCLUSION BY MEANS OF INTERMITTENT VENOUS OCCLUSIONREPORT OF A CASE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Surgical Service of the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1943;46(3):395-403. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220090090007
Abstract

Ligation of a main artery of the lower extremity, such as the common iliac, external iliac or common femoral, may result in gangrene even in the presence of a normal arterial system. A number of methods are available to prevent such a catastrophe from occurring. Therapeutic venous occlusion, produced by ligation of the concomitant vein when it is necessary to ligate a major artery, is one of the methods which has been advocated. This method was propounded by Makins,1 a British surgeon during World War I. He collected a series of cases to show that this procedure reduced the incidence of gangrene when it was necessary to ligate a major artery to a limb. Numerous attempts in the laboratory have been made to explain this somewhat paradoxic phenomenon. Some investigators2 have produced experimental evidence to prove that the actual arterial inflow to an extremity is increased after this

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