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Article
March 1943

DEMEROLA SUBSTITUTE FOR MORPHINE IN THE TREATMENT OF POSTOPERATIVE PAIN

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Departments of Therapeutics and Surgery, New York University College of Medicine, and the Third Surgical Division (New York University), Bellevue Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1943;46(3):404-409. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220090099008
Abstract

It is the purpose of this paper to present in greater detail a report of the effectiveness of demerol, a new synthetic analgesic, for the control of postoperative pain and restlessness. A complete discussion1 of the properties of the drug, including its effectiveness, safety and potency in the treatment of a large variety of conditions, has already been presented by one of us (R. C. B.).

Demerol2 (1-methyl-4-phenyl-piperidine-4-carboxylic acid ethyl ester hydrochloride) was introduced by Eisleb and Schaumann3 in 1939 and was almost immediately acclaimed by numerous investigators4 as a potent and safe analgesic approaching morphine in effectiveness. Its advantages, especially its antispasmodic properties, soon became apparent. Thus the atropine-like effect combined with sedative action makes it an ideal drug for the treatment of severe colicky pain. With exception of rare hypersensitive persons, demerol may be used without contraindication in patients with severe anemia, disease of

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