[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1943

EFFECTS OF JEJUNAL TRANSPLANTS ON EXPERIMENTAL PRODUCTION OF PEPTIC ULCERS

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Surgery of the New York Hospital and Cornell University Medical College.

Arch Surg. 1943;46(4):459-464. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220100003001
Abstract

Stefko, Andrus and Lord1 recently described the effects on the gastric secretion of transplantation to the stomach of a segment of jejunum with intact blood supply. Briefly, they observed that in 5 animals subjected to this procedure the normal response of increased acidity after injection of histamine was reversed in 4 and markedly reduced in the fifth, as demonstrated by direct measurements of the ph of the gastric mucosa of seven regions of the stomach. This same reversal was also strikingly evident in the analyses of the gastric contents, which showed a reduction of the average fasting free and combined acidities after jejunal transplantation, followed by a still further decrease after the injection of histamine.

The present paper deals with the effects of such jejunal transplants on experimental production of peptic ulcers of the duodenum through daily intramuscular injection of a mixture of histamine phosphate and beeswax in

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×