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Article
April 1943

THERAPEUTIC TRENDS AND OPERATIVE MORTALITY IN CASES OF OBSTRUCTIVE JAUNDICE

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES
From the Department of Surgery of the College of Medicine, University of Cincinnati, and the Cincinnati General Hospital, Cincinnati, Ohio.

Arch Surg. 1943;46(4):504-513. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220100048006
Abstract

The preoperative and postoperative management of patients with obstructive jaundice has evolved from a series of therapeutic contributions, each of which was in particular vogue for a period. The integral analysis of these methods is instructive, for it indicates the present trend, and forms a sounder basis not only for a modern therapeutic regimen but for further clinical and laboratory investigation. The factors that govern mortality in patients with obstructive jaundice and the philosophy of treatment that is soundest today are known to all. After synthetic vitamin K (menadione) and various related substances had been used parenterally for over one year with excellent results in the control of postoperative bleeding, the impression was obtained that at last the problem of the jaundiced patient undergoing surgical treatment, was under control.1 This impression was not entirely correct. Indeed, mortality reports from other clinics often indicated no better, and perhaps poorer, results

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