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Article
May 1943

THE TELESCOPING V OSTEOTOMYA GENERAL METHOD FOR CORRECTING ANGULAR AND ROTATIONAL DISALINEMENTS

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

Arch Surg. 1943;46(5):772-779. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220110188031
Abstract

Stable impingement of fracture fragments often occurs spontaneously. Maintenance of position is seldom a problem, and union is usually prompt. This principle of stable apposition has been generally applied in the treatment of fractures. In most cases the surgeon strives for such apposition in performing osteotomy.

The pointed telescoping type of osteotomy is not new, but I feel that the principle of inherent stability deserves a more general application through the simple method of this type of osteotomy than is often observed. While most surgeons have utilized the principle, the method receives scant attention (Steindler1; Campbell2). When the principle is properly applied, slight but precise corrections are easily maintained, and great modification of alinement may be attained without resort to a complicated procedure or to metallic fixation.

Up to late in the nineteenth century osteoclasis was the only safe means of correcting deformities of the long bones. During

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