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Article
August 1943

PRIMARY INTRACRANIAL LYMPHOSARCOMAA REPORT OF TWO CASES AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Neurosurgery, Mayo Foundation; ROCHESTER MINN.
Section on Neurologic Surgery of the Mayo Clinic.

Arch Surg. 1943;47(2):147-159. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220140029003
Abstract

In the past half-century pathologists have learned to recognize tumors arising from lymph nodes and other lymphatic structures in nearly every organ and structure of the body; however, so far as we can determine, the skull and intracranial dura mater have not been indicated as the primary site of origin of lymphosarcoma.1 Therefore, there is adequate cause for reporting 2 cases in which the primary focus appears to have been in the intracranial dura mater or possibly in the overlying cranial bone.

REPORT OF CASES 

Case 1.  —A white man, aged 24 years, came to the Mayo Clinic in August 1926, because of symptoms of an intracranial lesion. Two years before this, he had been struck by a baseball in the right parietal region but had not lost consciousness. There were no symptoms from this nor any other symptoms until four months before the patient came to the clinic,

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