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Article
August 1943

HEMORRHAGIC HYPOTENSION AND ITS TREATMENT BY INTRA-ARTERIAL AND INTRAVENOUS INFUSION OF BLOOD

Author Affiliations

INDIANAPOLIS
From the Lilly Laboratory for Clinical Research, Indianapolis City Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1943;47(2):178-191. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220140060006
Abstract

The suggestion was made to us by Col. Sam F. Seeley (Medical Corps, U. S. Army) that intra-arterial infusion of blood or plasma under a pressure equal to normal arterial pressure might have advantages over the conventional method of intravenous infusion in the treatment of shock. It was his view that intra-arterial infusion would elevate blood pressure rapidly, thus restoring tissue perfusion without delay; further, the exact amount of blood or plasma required to reestablish arterial pressure at any desired level would be given without the use of complex or inaccurate methods of calculation, since the intra-arterial infusion would autonomically check itself at this level. This report is based on an experimental study of Colonel Seely's suggestion.

We have also sought some test indicating the effects of hemorrhage and hypotension on the vascular system. Page1 had shown that the pressor response to angiotonin was severely depressed by hemorrhage; subsequently

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