[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 50.16.113.179. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 1943

CONFINEMENT TO BED FOR ONLY TWENTY-FOUR HOURS AFTER OPERATIONA MEANS OF PREVENTING PULMONARY AND CIRCULATORY COMPLICATIONS AND OF SHORTENING THE PERIOD OF CONVALESCENCE

Arch Surg. 1943;47(2):203-215. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1943.01220140085008
Abstract

As a result of getting patients out of bed on the first postoperative day and increasing their activity as tolerated (with respiratory exercises mentioned hereinafter), circulatory and pulmonary complications have been reduced to a minimum, intestinal function has been restored without enemas and the period of morbidity and disability has been diminished 50 per cent or more.

A previous publication1 on this subject precipitated editorial comments in several leading medical journals.2 These comments enable me to correct erroneous impressions surgeons inexperienced with early rising have had regarding it. In addition I am presenting another series of 464 consecutive surgical cases in which practically all the patients were subjected to early rising.

This article also brings to attention specific reflexes that initiate pathologic changes—changes that lead to complications—and presents evidence that early rising, with its modifying effect on these reflex reactions, should be instituted by the first postoperative day.

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×