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Article
March 1944

VITAMIN B1 NUTRITION IN SURGICAL PATIENTS AS DETERMINED BY THE BLOOD LEVEL OF PYRUVIC ACIDI. HEPATIC DISEASE

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS
From the Department of Surgery of the Louisiana State University School of Medicine and Charity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans.

Arch Surg. 1944;48(3):185-189. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1944.01230010193001
Abstract

Carboxylase is an enzyme which catalyzes the decarboxylation of pyruvic acid to carbon dioxide and water. It was first recognized by Neuberg and Karczag.1 Auhagen2 showed that the activity of carboxylase is dependent on the presence of a coenzyme which is known as cocarboxylase and which is found in animal tissues. Later Lohmann and Schuster3 were able to isolate cocarboxylase and to demonstrate that it is a pyrophosphoric ester of vitamin B1 (thiamine). Vitamin B1 (thiamine) after ingestion is absorbed from the intestine by diffusion into the blood stream. It reaches the liver and the kidneys, where phosphorylation takes place and where the thiamine is stored as cocarboxylase, or diphosphothiamine (Ochoa and Peters4; Westenbrink and Goudsmit5). Dephosphorylation of the diphosphothiamine may take place in all of the tissues but appears to be carried out mainly in the liver and the kidneys (Ochoa6; Tauber

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