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Article
March 1944

VITAMIN B1 NUTRITION IN SURGICAL PATIENTS AS DETERMINED BY THE BLOOD LEVEL OF PYRUVIC ACIDIII. RENAL DISEASE, NEOPLASTIC DISEASE AND INFECTION

Author Affiliations

NEW ORLEANS
From the Department of Surgery of the Louisiana State University School of Medicine and Charity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans.

Arch Surg. 1944;48(3):193-196. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1944.01230010201003
Abstract

It has been shown in previous papers that persons suffering from hepatic disease or from toxic thyroid disease present evidence of vitamin B1 malnutrition as revealed by the blood levels of pyruvic acid. The present paper is concerned with a study of persons suffering from renal disease, neoplastic disease and infection.

RENAL DISEASE  The kidney plays a significant role in the metabolism of vitamin B1. Greater amounts of this vitamin are present in the liver, heart, brain, muscles and kidneys than in other tissues. The kidneys excrete a considerable quantity of the vitamin daily. This excretion continues, but to a lesser extent, even in the presence of vitamin B1 deficiency. Finally, renal tissue is one of the tissues which can convert vitamin B1 into cocarboxylase (Westenbrink and Goudsmit1). In view of these facts the question arises: In the presence of renal disease is there diminished

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