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Article
March 1944

PROGRESSIVE EXOPHTHALMOS IN TOXIC DISEASE OF THE THYROID GLANDA REVIEW OF THE RECENT LITERATURE, WITH THE REPORT OF A CASE OF PROGRESSIVE POSTTHYROIDECTOMY PROPTOSIS IN A SIX YEAR OLD NEGRO GIRL

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES
From the 64th General Hospital, and from Charity Hospital of Louisiana at New Orleans.

Arch Surg. 1944;48(3):214-222. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1944.01230010222006
Abstract

Exophthalmos has been recognized as a phase of the syndrome of hyperthyroidism literally since the recognition of the disease, as the nomenclature of exophthalmic goiter shows. Persistent or progressive post-thyroidectomy exophthalmos has been recognized as a possible undesirable and a potentially serious sequel of the operation almost from the time the surgical treatment of hyperthyroidism was introduced. The successful therapy of postoperative exophthalmos, however, is little more than a decade old, and intensive study of the problem of both preoperative and postoperative proptosis has been carried out for an even shorter time, so short a time, in fact, that Means's1 statement in 1942 that "a new specialty of endocrinologic ophthalmology is a-borning" seems unduly optimistic.

CAUSATION OF EXOPHTHALMOS ASSOCIATED WITH HYPERTHYROIDISM  Statements concerning the clinical aspects of exophthalmos are widely divergent. Paulson2 and Cattell3 could find no correlation between the severity of the hyperthyroidism and the degree

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