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Article
April 1944

UNTOWARD EFFECTS OF VARIOUS SUBSTANCES RECOMMENDED FOR BURNS OR WOUNDSEXPERIMENTAL TESTS ON RATS

Author Affiliations

DURHAM, N. C.
From the Department of Pathology, Duke University School of Medicine and Duke Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1944;48(4):300-304. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1944.01230010310004
Abstract

Many substances have been recommended for application to burns1 and wounds, either as dressings or detergents. Some of these have been subjected to testing in rats, and the results are herewith presented.

Testing of substances for local effect on human beings under controlled conditions may be satisfactory and harmless, as shown by Cannon and Cope,2 who applied tannic acid and methylrosaniline chloride (gentian violet) to donor sites from which skin had been removed for grafting, and compared the rates of healing with those of a control area. Spontaneous human burns and wounds vary so greatly in size, depth, location and cleanliness that they cannot be used as standardized lesions to judge therapeutic results.

A method has been devised utilizing an inexpensive laboratory animal, the rat, which indicates the necrotizing effect locally in a quantitative fashion, and which permits some conclusions to be drawn regarding the general effects resulting

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