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Article
April 1944

COMPARATIVE VALUE OF SOME BLOOD SUBSTITUTES USED FOR TREATMENT OF EXPERIMENTAL SHOCK

Author Affiliations

U.S.N.R.; INDIANAPOLIS
From the Lilly Research Laboratories, Eli Lilly and Company, Indianapolis.

Arch Surg. 1944;48(4):315-318. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1944.01230010325006
Abstract

In shock resulting from hemorrhage, trauma or burns, therapy with intravenous injection of fluid is well established as decidedly beneficial. Numerous investigations deal with the value of blood and various blood substitutes in shock. This is partly owing to the desire to find a blood substitute which is highly efficient, readily available, relatively inexpensive and completely safe. Plasma or serum fulfils all requirements except that it is costly. In addition, to bring it to a readily available form, a vast amount of work is required. The great value of plasma outweighs these objections during emergencies such as the present war. In peacetime, these difficulties have considerable practical importance.

Although the use of blood substitutes in the treatment of shock has been widely studied, the results have often been conflicting. In such circumstances, further work is indicated, with attempts to control or standardize procedures more effectively. The present report is concerned

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