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Article
June 1944

EFFECTS OF CONTINUOUS AND OF INTERMITTENT APPLICATION OF A TOURNIQUET TO A TRAUMATIZED EXTREMITY

Author Affiliations

BALTIMORE
From the Department of Surgery of The Johns Hopkins University and Hospital. The work described in this paper was done under a contract, recommended by the Committee on Medical Research, between the Offices of Scientific Research and Development and Johns Hopkins University.

Arch Surg. 1944;48(6):489-490. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1944.01230010502010
Abstract

It is generally recognized1 that one should not employ a tourniquet for the control of bleeding if other means will suffice. If the use of a tourniquet is necessary, it is desirable to release it from time to time in order that some oxygen may be transported to the ischemic tissues. Unfortunately, the conditions in which the use of a tourniquet is required for the control of bleeding are usually such that intermittent release results in the loss of a prohibitive quantity of blood. Nevertheless, it appeared to be of interest to investigate experimentally the comparative effects of continuous and of intermittent application of a tourniquet to a traumatized extremity. In previous experiments2 it was found that the application of a tourniquet to a traumatized extremity reduced the chances of survival of the animal. Additional studies3 showed that cooling of the part distal to the tourniquet lessened

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