[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.92.239.248. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 1944

EFFECT OF TOPICAL APPLICATION OF VITAMINS AND SOME OTHER CHEMICALS ON THE HEALING OF WOUNDS

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Second and Fourth Medical Services (Harvard), Boston City Hospital, and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

Arch Surg. 1944;49(4):225-227. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1944.01230020233002
Abstract

Many studies have been reported of the effect of various substances in promoting the healing of wounds. Most of these investigations have dealt with antibacterial drugs, but some have dealt with dietary measures which tend to improve the condition of the subject as a whole and in turn increase the rate of healing of wounds.1 Deficiency in the body of proteins,2 vitamins A and Dla and vitamins C3 impairs the rate of healing of wounds.

A number of local factors influence healing. Messer and McClellan4 found that wounds benefited more from an alkaline pH than from an acid one. Several investigators5 reported that the local application of concentrated urea is of distinct aid in promoting healing of wounds, particularly for removing debris and necrotic tissues. However, this therapy is often associated with marked discomfort. Compounds containing the sulfhydryl radical6 stimulate growth of

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×