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Article
February 1945

PROGRESS IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY FOR 1943 A REVIEW PREPARED BY AN EDITORIAL BOARD OF THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ORTHOPAEDIC SURGEONSXVIII. AMPUTATIONS, APPARATUS AND TECHNIC

Author Affiliations

GREENVILLE, S. C.

Arch Surg. 1945;50(2):89-97. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1945.01230030094008
Abstract

Amputations.  —As would be expected during wartime, many articles on amputations have appeared. Nothing particularly new has been published, but ten or a dozen papers discuss the value of refrigeration as an appropriate anesthetic, particularly for extremely ill patients and for those in whom serious vascular disease exists, with or without gangrene.606 Kennedy607 emphasizes its importance in military service and in civilian practice, where it is so valuable in diabetic gangrene and vascular disease. Allen and Crossman608 state the belief that thrombotic and embolic accidents are reduced by the use of refrigeration. The death rate in their cases has fallen from 60 to 15 per cent as the result of using refrigeration. The general consensus is that healing is to some degree retarded when refrigeration is employed, but to no serious extent, notwithstanding popular lay articles to the contrary, such as the brief paper by Doane,609

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