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Article
July 1945

NITROGEN BALANCE STUDIES ON SURGICAL PATIENTS RECEIVING AMINO ACIDSOBSERVATIONS ON PATIENTS WITH OBSTRUCTING LESIONS OF THE ESOPHAGUS AND STOMACH RECEIVING AMINO ACIDS BY PARENTERAL INJECTIONS AS THE EXCLUSIVE SOURCE OF PROTEIN

Author Affiliations

Abbott Fellow in Surgery, Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School; CHICAGO
From the Hektoen Institute for Medical Research of the Cook County Hospital, the Department of Surgery of the Cook County Hospital and the Cook County Graduate School of Medicine, and the Department of Surgery, Northwestern University Medical School.

Arch Surg. 1945;51(1):59-68. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1945.01230040062009
Abstract

In the six years that have elapsed since Elman and Weiner1 first succeeded in giving amino acids intravenously to human beings, the parenteral administration of amino acids in the form of specially prepared protein hydrolysates has become an established clinical procedure. This has been particularly true in the management of cases of gastrointestinal diseases in which the existence of protein deficiency is usually easily recognized and in which the possibility of oral alimentation is limited or impossible. At first glance the nutritional value of such a method of feeding would appear obvious. However, many factors are involved in its successful application. Even though the products available for parenteral use are derived from nutritionally good proteins, it is not safe to assume them to be adequate until they are proved by proper studies under controlled conditions to be able to provide nitrogen balance. Also, it is necessary to recognize the

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