[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.146.176.30. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 1945

SKELETAL FIXATION OF MANDIBULAR FRACTURESREPORT OF FIVE CASES, WITH NINE FRACTURES

Author Affiliations

DIXON, ILL.

Arch Surg. 1945;51(4):279-282. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1945.01230040288007
Abstract

Injuries to the head have been steadily increasing in the past quarter of a century, and fractures of the mandible in particular have increased manyfold. The illustration (fig. 1) from Fomon's textbook1 shows the various sites of fractures and the frequency of occurrence. While this is an accurate and standard chart, the present situation presents a more complex picture. The forces causing head injuries seem to be more intense, with the result that the fractures are frequently multiple and the displacement of the fragments extremely complicating.

Broken jaws have been recorded in medical history since 3,000 B. C., according to Breasted's2 translation of the Edwin Smith surgical papyrus. Since this recording of such an injury, there have been numerous methods of treatment. We have tried many of these with varying degrees of success. Until the advent of skeletal fixation. there has not been a universal method of treatment

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×