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Article
January 1946

EFFECT OF INTRAVENOUS ADMINISTRATION OF OXYGEN ON SHOCK IN DOGS AND IN HUMAN BEINGS

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN; SANITARY CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; BROOKLYN
From the Departments of Pathology and Surgery, Beth-El Hospital and Jewish Hospital for Chronic Diseases, Brooklyn, and the Office of the Chief Medical Examiner of the City of New York.; Dr. Jennings, chief surgeon of the Beth-E1 Hospital, died on May 25, 1945.

Arch Surg. 1946;52(1):42-49. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1946.01230050044003
Abstract

THAT anoxemia is an important factor in the pathogenesis of traumatic shock has long been recognized.1 Experimental2 and clinical3 investigations have yielded encouraging results in combating such shock by the inhalation of high concentrations (100 per cent commercial) of oxygen. Boothby and his collaborators3 expressed the opinion that the use of such high concentrations of oxygen resulted in a significantly greater degree of recovery than when the usual 95 per cent oxygen and 5 per cent carbon dioxide inhalant mixture was employed. The additional 5 per cent oxygen yielded an increase of 2.2 cc. of oxygen per hundred cubic centimeters of blood. Small though the increase be it causes a rise in oxygen saturation of capillary and venous blood in cases of shock from 20 per cent saturation to 33 per cent saturation. The oxygen partial pressure rises from 14 to 21 mm., with an equivalent

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