[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.19.31. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1946

SYNTHETIC ADHESIVES IN THE TREATMENT OF WOUNDS OF THE LIVER AND OTHER SURGICAL CONDITIONSA Preliminary Report

Author Affiliations

BEVERLY HILLS, CALIF.

Arch Surg. 1946;52(2):160-171. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1946.01230050164004
Abstract

IN SEPTEMBER 1943, I conceived the idea of attempting to control hemorrhage in abdominal viscera and elsewhere by the application of the so-called commercial Scotch tape.

The adhesiveness of this material in extirpated chicken organs was established in preliminary experiments. In dead animals, severed nerves and arteries were also held together by this substance, as were cut skin edges.

EXPERIMENTAL STUDIES  Rabbits 3 to 5 months old were selected for the in vivo experiments. To date, 17 rabbits have been operated on, with 1 death. Eleven additional rabbits comprised a control group. Of these, 8 rabbits died in the first twenty-four hours and 3 lived.In each operation, a large pie-shaped section of the rabbit liver was completely extirpated. No attempt was made to control the profuse bleeding with sutures or packs or by bringing together the sides of the wound in the liver. Instead, the resulting hiatus was covered

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×