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Article
February 1946

GUNSHOT WOUND OF THE THORACIC ESOPHAGUSReport of a Case

Arch Surg. 1946;52(2):172-176. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1946.01230050176005
Abstract

RECOVERY following an injury to the thoracic esophagus by an extrinsic foreign body is believed to be exceedingly uncommon. This impression is further borne out by a quotation from a Hunterian Lecture delivered by Gordon-Taylor at the Royal College of Surgeons of England in May 1944, and subsequently published in the British Journal of Surgery: "The story of wounds of the œsophagus is not unnaturally dispiriting [in the] National War Collection. I am informed, however, that Lt.-Colonel A. L. d'Abreu has actually saved a man wounded in the thoracic œsophagus, which must rank as one of the most splendid triumphs of surgical prowess." In view of the infrequency with which recovery is known to occur following such injuries, it seems of interest to report the following case.

REPORT OF CASE  A 20 year old soldier, while participating on May 17, 1944 in a field problem in which live ammunition was

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