[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.19.31. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 1946

TOXEMIA SYNDROME AFTER BURNSBIOCHEMICAL AND PATHOLOGIC OBSERVATIONS AND STUDIES

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA
From the Pennsylvania Hospital and the Harrison Department of Surgical Research, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1946;52(2):177-186. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1946.01230050181006
Abstract

Following an extensive thermal burn, a complex derangement of normal physiologic processes develops, which can be separated into at least two components, shock and toxemia. Most of the recent developments in the systemic treatment of burns have been directed toward decreasing the severity of shock, and as the treatment of shock has improved one has seen more patients survive the period of shock only to succumb to toxemia.

For many years shock and toxemia were regarded as one process. Observers debated whether the whole picture was due to toxins produced in the area of the burn and distributed throughout the body by the circulation or whether the local loss of plasma in the burned area, with the resultant disturbance of circulatory dynamics, was the primary cause of systemic damage.

In 1923 the toxin theory, supported by the work of Boyd and Robertson,1 was in the ascendency, but during the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×