[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.187.2. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 1946

PHYSIOLOGIC CONSIDERATIONS IN THE CARE OF PATIENTS WITH VARICOSE VEINS

Author Affiliations

Professor of Physiology, University of Texas Medical Branch; Clinical Physiologist, John Sealy Hospital GALVESTON, TEXAS; SAN FRANCISCO

Arch Surg. 1946;52(4):402-420. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1946.01230050409002
Abstract

THE current shortage of labor has increased the number of patients who seek treatment for varicose veins or their complications. The symptoms, which previously had been negligible or at least tolerable, have become important after long hours of work. If these patients are to be able to work in comfort, they must have more treatment than the casual bandage, injection or ligation. So it seems worth while to present, somewhat dogmatically, a system of management which applies to the large majority of the simpler cases. It lays no claim to newness or fundamental originality but is founded on the practices developed at the Outpatient Department of the University of California Medical School. This treatment of ulcers has been tested in the Outpatient Department of the John Sealy Hospital at Galveston, Tex.

PHYSIOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY  The chief features of all varicose conditions, considered from a physiologic point of view, are valvular

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×