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Article
April 1946

PENICILLIN OINTMENT-IMPREGNATED GAUZE IN THE LOCAL TREATMENT OF INFECTIONS

Author Affiliations

MADISON, WIS.
From the Chemosurgery Clinic, Wisconsin General Hospital and the McArdle Laboratory, University of Wisconsin Medical School.

Arch Surg. 1946;52(4):466-478. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1946.01230050473006
Abstract

LOCAL administration of penicillin, either alone or in combination with general administration, is often advantageous in the treatment of localized infections in accessible sites. However, the commonly used means of topical application have certain disadvantages. For example, sprinkling of penicillin powder on infected surfaces does not carry the material into crevices and tracts, and as Bodenham1 has pointed out, the drug may be too rapidly absorbed and excreted by the body; moreover, powdered sodium penicillin in undiluted form is somewhat irritating to the tissues. The instillation of penicillin solutions, though satisfactory in situations in which the instilled material is well retained, is often inefficient because the solution drains away from all but the more dependent portions of the lesion. Gauze packs soaked in penicillin solution require relatively large amounts of the drug, and there are often technical difficulties in maintaining contact with all parts of the lesion and in

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