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Article
May 1946

PLAN FOR THE CARE OF PERIPHERAL NERVE INJURIES OVERSEAS

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES
Now in private practice at 405 Wainwright Building, Norfolk, Va.

Arch Surg. 1946;52(5):557-570. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1946.01230050565005

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Abstract

EARLY operative procedures on traumatized major peripheral nerves have been made possible during World War II by the improvement made in management of wounds, which under the present program results in more than 90 per cent of soft tissue wounds being well healed within three weeks from the time of injury. Scar formation is thus materially reduced about the injured nerve. This facilitates exposure, aids in the gross interpretation of the pathologic status of the nerve and eventually lessens the bed of constricting scar about the suture line. Infection is uncommon in the uncomplicated wound, and thus the necessity for delaying six months or more before repairing the nerve is obviated.

The present method of handling the injured nerve requires close cooperation of the forward and the base surgeons, by whom a well understood plan must be integrated. Each phase of care of wounds must be accurately completed if the

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