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Article
January 1947

GASTRIC ULCERS PRODUCED EXPERIMENTALLY BY VASCULAR LIGATION

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Department of Pathology, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons.

Arch Surg. 1947;54(1):58-66. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1947.01230070061005
Abstract

VIRCHOW'S hypothesis1 that human gastric ulcers were vascular in origin led to several attempts to reproduce similar lesions in animals by ligation of the gastric vessels. For the most part no significant results were obtained. Dogs were generally used, and short of total interference with the blood supply ligation had no effect on the intactness of the stomach.2 This was largely due to a highly efficient collateral circulation. There is a complete circle of anastomoses around the two curvatures of the canine stomach,3 and when the main arteries are tied the blood flow through intercommunicating branches is sufficient to maintain the nutrition of the organ. In human beings4 the anatomic arrangement of the blood supply of the stomach is practically the same as that in dogs. Recently, Somervell5 tied the gastric arteries in a large series of cases of duodenal ulcer, and no complications referable

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