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Article
February 1947

INCISED WOUNDS OF THE HEAD INFLICTED BY BAYONETS

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES
Dr. Abbott has now returned to civilian status, Rochester, Minnesota.

Arch Surg. 1947;54(2):121-137. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1947.01230070126002
Abstract

A REVIEW of recent and older medical literature discloses that the occurrence of bayonet wounds of the head is rather infrequent if not rare. I had an opportunity to observe and treat 5 patients who had penetrating craniocerebral wounds incurred with bayonets. Because of the peculiarities as well as the rarity of this type of head wound, the 5 cases are recorded herein, together with a résumé of the history of the bayonet and a review of the medical literature pertaining to such injuries.

HISTORICAL ASPECTS 

Bayonet.  —The infliction and treatment of incised wounds of the head from sharp-edged weapons have been of prime importance to man's existence since prehistoric times. Although in ancient times swords and spears were common implements of warfare, in more recent centuries the bayonet has taken their place and now it remains the one sharp-edged weapon of common usage by foot soldiers. The origin of

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