[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.145.176.252. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 1947

ISOLATED PARALYSIS OF THE SERRATUS MAGNUS FOLLOWING SURGICAL PROCEDURESReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

KANSAS CITY, KAN.
From the Department of Anesthesiology, Hixon Laboratory for Medical Research, University of Kansas Hospitals.

Arch Surg. 1947;54(6):656-659. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1947.01230070667004
Abstract

PARALYSIS of the serratus magnus muscle following surgical treatment probably occurs more frequently than is usually suspected. Cotton and Allen1 reported 30 cases of peripheral paralysis in a review of the literature up to 1903. No other cases appeared in the literature until 1926, when Thorek2 cited a case which he saw that year. The scarcity of reports since 1926 is remarkable.

Of the muscles supplied by the brachial plexus, the serratus magnus, by its anatomy and nerve supply, is most logically susceptible to isolated paralysis. The muscle is generally described as being formed of three parts: The upper part originates from the first two ribs and from a fibrous arch uniting these two attachments, and is inserted on the costal surface of the scapula near its medial angle. The middle part arises from the second, third and sometimes the fourth ribs, and spreads out into a thin

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×