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Article
August 1947

RESECTION OF THE VAGUS NERVES FOR ULCER: AN INTERIM EVALUATIONI. Operative Technic and Hospital Management

Author Affiliations

Assistant Professor of Surgery, Harvard Medical School; Assistant Surgeon, Massachusetts General Hospital BOSTON

Arch Surg. 1947;55(2):164-174. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1947.01230080169006
Abstract

RESECTION of the vagus nerves for ulcer, like any other application of autonomic surgery, may be considered to embody three rather distinct areas for study and development. The first of these concerns the technical procedure itself, its extent, its intrinsic surgical complications and the immediate hospital morbidity and mortality. The second area embodies the physiologic response of the patient. No autonomic nerve can be interrupted, be it the presacral plexus, the lumbar sympathetic, the splanchnic nerve, or the vagus, without producing physiologic changes, an understanding of which is absolutely essential to intelligent clinical application of the procedure. The third area in this field involves close examination of the clinical end results. Clinical results may be extremely variable in their degree of dependence on the first two factors.

In this paper it is my wish to outline the technical procedures which my colleagues and I have employed in vagus resection for

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