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Article
March 1948

SYNTHETIC RESIN—A NEW ANTACID FOR TREATMENT OF PEPTIC ULCER

Author Affiliations

NEWARK, N. J.
From the Presbyterian Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1948;56(3):318-328. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1948.01240010325002
Abstract

SINCE the invention of "celluloid" by Hyatt in 1869 the synthetic plastics industry has extended so widely that it touches on almost every sphere of science and industry. Synthetic plastics, such as acrylics, "vinylite," "cellophane," "nylon" and "bakelite"1 are now employed as surgical appliances, instruments, sutures and dressings, but the plastics have not been used in clinical medicine. We are now studying a plastic substance commercially known as "amberlite IR IV," a synthetic resin which is chemically allied to "bakelite," and in this paper2 will describe its effect on peptic ulcer.

DESCRIPTION OF RESINOUS PLASTICS  Natural resins have been known and used since antiquity. Miastic and storax, natural resins, were employed by the Egyptians in preserving their mummies, and frankincense, a natural resin, was among the gifts of the Magi to the Infant Jesus. During the Renaissance, Rembrandt and Da Vinci were known to have improved their paintings

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