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Article
August 1948

DOUBLE AORTIC ARCHReport of Two Cases

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO; SALT LAKE CITY
From the Children's Memorial Hospital, Chicago.

Arch Surg. 1948;57(2):227-233. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1948.01240020232005
Abstract

NOTHING stimulates more interest in a hitherto hopeless condition than the discovery of an effective means of therapeusis. This has been especially true recently in the entire field of congenital cardiac disease. For about two hundred years pathologists had known of double aortic arch, a rather rare abnormality, and physicians had correlated the postmortem observations with the rather classic clinical history. Case reports were occasionally published but read by few, because "nothing could be done anyway" for the unfortunate children. Then, in 1945, Gross1 published the first report of a child with a double aortic arch successfully treated surgically. Now every pediatrician is on the lookout for such cases.

The clinical picture of this anomaly is rather characteristic. Laryngeal stridor and difficult respiration are usually the first symptoms which indicate to the mother that all is not well with her child. These symptoms appear shortly after birth, may be

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