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Article
December 1948

PROGRESS IN ORTHOPEDIC SURGERY FOR 1946 A Review Prepared by an Editorial Board of the American Academy of Orthopaedic SurgeonsV. TUMORS OF BONE AND OF SYNOVIAL MEMBRANE

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Orthopedic Surgery; Fellows in Surgery; Fellows in Orthopedic Surgery; Fellow in Neurology and Psychiatry ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Section on Orthopedic Surgery, Mayo Clinic.; The authors and their assistants are from the Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, Rochester, Minn.

Arch Surg. 1948;57(6):871-896. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1948.01240020881010
Abstract

SIMPLE BONE CYSTS  TAVERNIER180 discusses simple bone cysts and states that they can be cured by relatively simple measures. He advocates curettage, followed usually by bone grafting in the cystic cavity. In several cases in which repeated fractures and rapid healing were followed by cysts, permanent healing and replacement of the cyst by normal bone were obtained by curettage and bone graft. Three cases were cited as examples. He points out that fractures through bone cysts are often characterized by rapid healing. Relapses, recurrence of bone cysts and refracture follow later. He states that healing of a fracture through a bone cyst does not constitute a cure.

Ed. Note.  —As a rule fracture through a bone cyst with healing of the fracture does not always constitute a cure of the cyst, and other measures usually have to be taken, such as curettage and bone grafting. Measures such as the

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