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Article
February 1949

UNFAVORABLE REACTIONS TO OXIDIZED CELLULOSE (OXYCEL) IN THE BED OF THE GALLBLADDERThe "Retained Oxycel Sponge Syndrome"

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS
Dr. Vanderhoof is a Fellow in Surgery at Ancker Hospital, Saint Paul, Minn., under the auspices of the Kellogg Foundation Grant of the University of Minnesota.; Dr. Merendino, on Jan. 1, 1949, assumed the duties of Associate Professor of Surgery, University of Washington, Seattle.; From the Department of Surgery, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, and the Surgical Service of the Ancker Hospital, St. Paul, Minn.

Arch Surg. 1949;58(2):182-188. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240030187005
Abstract

SINCE the early work on oxidized cellulose by Yackel and Kenyon1 in 1941, repeated experiments have been conducted on laboratory animals in order to evaluate its hemostatic action, absorbability, and the reaction of tissues to it. Putnam2 embedded small pieces of oxidized cellulose paper in the abdominal muscles of cats and dogs and demonstrated the complete absorption of the material in most cases. He also implanted pieces of oxidized cellulose gauze in the folds of the omentum in dogs. Examination after eleven days revealed a thickening of the omentum, but microscopic study demonstrated a minimal inflammatory reaction and the complete resolution of the gauze. Uihlein and others3 conducted studies which indicated that a complete dissolution of the oxidized gauze occurred in four and a half days when it was placed in human surgical wounds. Oxidized cellulose was packed into experimentally produced lacerations of dog's liver, kidney and

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