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Article
March 1949

EXTENT OF STRANGULATION OF THE SMALL INTESTINE COMPATIBLE WITH LIFEExperimental Study

Author Affiliations

LOS ANGELES
From the Hunterian Laboratory, the Department of Surgery and Graduate School of Medicine, College of Medical Evangelists.

Arch Surg. 1949;58(3):312-317. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240030318008
Abstract

SUDDEN interference with the blood supply to the intestines in human beings occurs frequently and has a high mortality rate. The exact degree of acute decrease in blood supply that the human intestine can withstand and still retain viability is unknown. This question is of practical importance when encountered in conditions of strangulated intestinal obstruction, mesenteric thrombosis or embolism and in the preparation of the wall of the bowel for intestinal anastomosis. It is generally accepted that deficient blood supply is an important cause of marginal gangrene in a suture line.1

Welch and Mall2 have shown that if more than 5 cm. of small intestine in the dog is deprived of arterial blood supply, the segment will undergo infarction and gangrene. Eisberg3 also demonstrated that the blood entering through the intramural channels at each end of such a loop could maintain viability in the intestine only for

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