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Article
July 1949

BLEEDING CONTROL AND ABSORPTION OF SYNTHETIC ADHESIVESA Second Report

Author Affiliations

BEVERLY HILLS, CALIF.
From the Department of Experimental Medicine, University of Southern California Medical School.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(1):147-165. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240040150011
Abstract

IN A PREVIOUS publication1 the practicability of controlling bleeding in abdominal viscera by the application of synthetic adhesives was demonstrated in rabbits and mice.

Analogues of the commercial so-called Scotch tape were used in enclosing gaps in the liver from which sections had been extirpated. The animals were later killed and the tissue reactions studied. Criteria considered essential for a satisfactory synthetic adhesive were (1) tack, or ability to adhere to viscera or tissue sufficiently to control bleeding; (2) absorbability, with the minimum of surrounding tissue reaction, and (3) sterilization potential.

With the cooperation of the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company, makers of Scotch tape, special synthetic adhesive films have been developed in the attempt to embody these requisites in one tape structure.

As this investigation, begun in September 1943, is concerned with the hemostatic and absorptive qualities of certain particular synthetic adhesives in rats, mice, rabbits, dogs and

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