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Article
July 1949

MULTIPLE PRIMARY TUMORS WITH FIBROSARCOMA AND COEXISTING CARCINOMA OF THE LUNG

Author Affiliations

BROOKLYN
From the departments of thoracic surgery and pathology, Jewish Hospital of Brooklyn.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(1):166-175. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240040169012
Abstract

THE INCIDENCE of multiple primary tumors is low. Slaughter,1 confirming the impression of Warren and Gates,2 stated that cases of multiple primary malignant growths represent 3.9 per cent of all cases of cancer. Primary sarcoma of the lung constituting one of these tumors is even less common. Primary carcinoma of the lung, on the other hand, is by no means an uncommon disease—constituting about 10 per cent of all cases of cancer seen at necropsy—and is occasionally seen in instances in which two primary cancers coexist in the same person. The occurrence of a primary carcinoma of the lung in a patient who has a primary sarcoma of that organ with another benign tumor of the contralateral lung is extremely rare. It is even rarer to find such a state further complicated by several benign tumors in other organs.3 The case to be reported is an example

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