[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 1949

INTUSSUSCEPTION DUE TO FAMILIAL ADENOMA OF THE SMALL INTESTINE

Author Affiliations

RICHMOND, VA.
From the Surgical Service of Stuart Circle Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(2):250-257. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240040255008
Abstract

AMONG the surgical emergencies of the abdomen, intussusception is one of the most urgent, and the relative infrequence of this condition after infancy makes isolated cases in older persons of particular interest to the general surgeon.

Intussusception in the first two years of life is of fairly frequent occurrence, while in the rest of the life span it is peculiarly infrequent. In an analysis of cases of intussusception, Perrin and Lindsay1 found that of 400, 78.5 per cent occurred in the first two years and 69.75 per cent in the first year of life. Of the type of intussusception occurring in infants, no etiologic factor was apparent in 95 per cent of the cases, while in the form found later in life a definite causative agent usually is found. Dickson2 stated that intussusception in the adult is always secondary to some underlying condition.

Perrin and Lindsay listed the

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×