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Article
August 1949

EFFECT OF OXIDIZED CELLULOSE IN THE PROTECTION OF THE SUTURE LINE IN INTESTINAL ANASTOMOSES IN DOGS

Author Affiliations

LA CROSSE, WIS.
From the Department of Surgery, St. Louis University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(2):326-336. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240040331013
Abstract

LEAKAGE from the suture line in intestinal anastomoses is a complication of the gravest nature. Since oxidized cellulose, an absorbable substance that can be left in the tissues, has been introduced into surgical practice, its value as a protective aid in intestinal anastomoses seemed worthy of investigation.

The literature on intestinal anastomoses has been extremely voluminous.1 The fundamental work of Lembert2 and Halsted,3 insisting on the importance of the serosal and submucosal sutures, remains the basis of successful anastomoses of the bowel.

As revealed by a rather extensive search of the literature,1 the use of materials in protection of the anastomotic suture line apparently has not been reported to any great extent. Freeman4 suggested the use of omental grafts for this purpose; Fenton and Peet5 reported on the use of omental grafts in intestinal anastomoses in dogs. Devine6 presented a preliminary report in

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