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Article
September 1949

TRANSPLANTATION OF THE SPINAL CORD FOR PARAPLEGIA SECONDARY TO POTT'S DISEASE OF THE SPINAL COLUMN

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Neurosurgery, Mayo Foundation ROCHESTER, MINN.
Dr. Love is from the Section on Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(3):409-421. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240040417004
Abstract

THE PARAPLEGIA resulting from Pott's disease may occur in any stage of the disease and may be a result of several factors. Butler,1 in a thoroughly studied series of cases, found the incidence of paraplegia in all stages of the disease to be 11.4 per cent. Other authors have cited figures of from 5 to 20 per cent as the incidence of paralysis in this disease. The results of treatment vary somewhat with the extent and neurologic type of the paralysis, the cause of the paralysis and the method of treatment.

It is evident that there are many pros and cons concerning the use of a surgical attack for the relief of paralysis due to tuberculous abscesses and granulation tissue, compression of the spinal cord by pathologic fractures of vertebral bodies, vascular and toxic disturbances of the spinal cord incident to tuberculous disease and the formation of bony ridges

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