[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 1949

A METHOD FOR CONTROL OF BLEEDING FROM ESOPHAGEAL VARICES

Author Affiliations

DETROIT
From the Department of Surgery, Wayne University College of Medicine, and the Veterans Administration Hospital, Dearborn, Mich.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(3):502-506. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240040510014
Abstract

ONE OF the most dramatic and hazardous types of bleeding from the gastrointestinal tract is that from esophageal varices. Esophageal varices commonly occur in association with cirrhosis of the liver. In such instances the dilated esophageal vessel is a reflection of increased tension in the portal system. Several methods have been devised for controlling hemorrhage from varices, most of them being a direct attack on the varix itself. In 1939 Crafoord and Frenckner1 described the nonsurgical treatment of varicose veins by injection of a sclerosing solution under direct vision. Phemister2 in 1947 reported 1 case with treatment by total gastrectomy and 1 with treatment by esophagogastric resection for bleeding esophageal varices in Banti's syndrome. None of these methods attempt to control the cause of the varix but, rather, attempt to treat the varix itself by removal of the dilated veins or by an attempt to cause clotting within

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×