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Article
October 1949

EARLY AND DELAYED CLINICAL EFFECTS OF VAGOTOMY FOR PEPTIC ULCER

Author Affiliations

BEVERLY HILLS, CALIF.
Dr. Kipen is in the department of surgery at the United States Veterans Administration General Hospital, Los Angeles, and Dr. Stevens consultant in surgery at that hospital and associate clinical professor of surgery, University of California at Los Angeles.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(4):814-824. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240040823002
Abstract

BETWEEN Nov. 1, 1946 and Nov. 1, 1947, vagus resection for treatment of peptic ulcer, as recently advocated by Dragstedt,1 was performed in 42 cases at the Veterans Administration General Hospital at Los Angeles (Sawtelle), Calif. All patients were operated on by surgeons of the joint graduate teaching service of the University of Southern California, College of Medical Evangelists, and the University of California at Los Angeles medical schools. The patients, all men, varied in age from 20 to 68 years, the average age being 47½ years. One or more of the classic indications for surgical intervention in treatment of peptic ulcer were present in all cases, namely, (1) chronicity with poor response to, or inability to carry out, an adequate medical regimen, (2) hemorrhage and (3) obstruction. The duration of symptoms varied from four months to twenty years, the average being 11.2 years. Recurrent or intractable pain was

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