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Article
October 1949

TECHNIC FOR ARTHRODESIS OF THE HIP WHEN THE FEMORAL HEAD AND NECK ARE ABSENT

Author Affiliations

CALIF.; NEW YORK
From the Orthopedic Section of the Walter Reed General Hospital, Washington, D. C.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(4):888-895. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240040897009
Abstract

ARTHRODESIS of the hip joint when the femoral head has been removed or when there is nonunion of the femoral neck with a necrotic head presents certain difficulties not present in other circumstances. The chief of these is in maintaining the trochanter in the freshened acetabulum without placing the lower extremity in too much abduction. Another is in obtaining enough bony contact between the femur and the ilium to assure fusion without an unduly prolonged period of immobilization. Since the upper end of the trochanter is rather small, there is more difficulty placing grafts to good advantage than when the head and neck are present. In the technic to be described, these difficulties have been satisfactorily overcome.

During World War II, a considerable number of patients were seen who had been struck in the hip by a high velocity missile which shattered the neck of the femur. Infection of the

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