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Article
November 1949

ACUTE ABDOMINAL MANIFESTATIONS IN SICKLE CELL DISEASEA Report of Three Cases, with Laparotomy in Two

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK
From the Second Surgical Service, Lincoln Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(5):993-1000. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240041003001
Abstract

ONLY a small proportion of Negroes with the sickle cell trait have the active form of the disease.1 In 1929 Levy2 found that of 213 Negroes admitted in succession to the New Rochelle Hospital, 12, or 5.8 per cent, had "sickling." Murphy and Shapiro3 recorded its incidence in the North American Negro as from 7 to 13 per cent, with anywhere from 1 in 7 to 1 in 40 of those affected showing clinical disease and with a total of almost 135,000 diseased in the United States. Wintrobe4 expressed the belief that 1 in 40 Negroes in North America and up to 9 per cent in Central and South America are so affected.

Huck5 first pointed out that the trait was transmitted by the male and the female as a mendelian dominant characteristic. It occurs in males in a ratio of 3 to 16; usually children and adolescents are affected, though

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