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Article
November 1949

EXPLORATIONS INTO THE PHYSIOLOGIC BASIS FOR THE THERAPEUTIC USE OF RESTRICTIVE BANDAGES IN THERMAL TRAUMAAn Experimental Study

Author Affiliations

BOSTON
From the Surgical Research Laboratories of the Harvard Medical School at the Massachusetts General Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(5):1056-1069. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240041066007
Abstract

ENTHUSIASTIC recommendations of the use of pressure dressings and plaster casts in the local treatment of burns have appeared from a number of clinics.1 Pressure dressings are advised because they tend to limit swelling of the wound, while plaster casts, if applied immediately after injury, prevent swelling.1c Although nearly all authors agree that such restrictive dressings are beneficial to wound healing, they have been advocated for a variety of reasons. Allen and Kochla hold that an occlusive pressure dressing restores the tissue pressure normally dependent on an intact integument and thus aids in the return of venous blood. They cited Blair2 as pointing out that pressure limits both venous and lymph stasis. Noticing that the dressings promote comfort and that the wounds showed minimal infection, Siler and Reidlb recommended pressure because it tends to prevent the loss of plasma from the circulation, a point on

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