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Article
November 1949

MORTALITY AND MORBIDITY IN SURGERY OF THE BILIARY TRACTA Comparison of Two Consecutive Ten Year Periods

Author Affiliations

Clinical Instructor in Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine; Clinical Professor of Surgery, University of Illinois College of Medicine CHICAGO
From the Surgery I Service of St. Luke's Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1949;59(5):1070-1076. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1949.01240041080008
Abstract

ADVANCEMENTS made in the last few years in preoperative and postoperative care, such as better intravenous administration of fluids, amino acid and protein hydrolysates, antibiotic drugs like penicillin and the sulfonamide compounds, more available blood transfusions, vitamin K and better anesthetic procedures, should all reflect on the mortality of surgery of the biliary tract. A report in 1946 by Sanders1 suggested that the mortality rate had not been reduced appreciably, whereas Orr's2 recently reported statistics showed a definite improvement (table 1).

In this series the mortality has been markedly decreased in the last ten years as compared with the preceding ten year period (table 2). The decrease was from 8.3 per cent in the years 1927 to 1937 to 2.8 per cent in the years 1937 to 1947. The improvement is noted particularly in the cases of acute cholecystitis and in the marked decrease in deaths due to

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