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Article
January 1950

BEHAVIOR OF GELATIN FILM IN HUMAN TISSUE AND AS AN AID IN THE REPAIR OF PLEURAL DEFECTS

Author Affiliations

WOOD, WIS.
From the departments of surgery and pathology, Veterans Administration Hospital, Wood, Wis., and the Marquette University School of Medicine.

Arch Surg. 1950;60(1):87-91. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1950.01250010103009
Abstract

THE CLINICAL use of absorbable gelatin materials has been accepted as a valuable surgical adjunct in the past few years.1 Our interest in the surgical use of gelatin film was first stimulated in the course of a comparative study of the effect on human tissues of absorbable sponges and various plastic materials. As the result of these studies we felt that the film might be used as an aid in the closure of troublesome pleural defects. This report presents our experience with gelatin film used in this capacity.

The gelatin film2 used was supplied in sheets of 4 by 5 inches (10.16 by 12.7 cm.), sterilized in appropriate paper packets. The film is slightly thicker than common cellophane. It can be cut with ease to any desired size or shape. It is pliable and can be sewn, although because of its brittleness it is readily torn. Its pliability

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