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Article
April 1950

EFFECT OF VARIATIONS IN THE AMOUNT OF MERCURY ON THE SPEED OF INTESTINAL INTUBATION

Author Affiliations

DETROIT
From Grace Hospital.

Arch Surg. 1950;60(4):762-770. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1950.01250010783011
Abstract

IN RECENT years the widespread acceptance of metallic mercury within the head of tubes for intestinal decompression as a highly effective method of obtaining intestinal intubation has resulted in its use in practically all such tubes. It was found by using metallic mercury in the balloon of these tubes that the number of successful intubations increased and the duodenum was intubated more rapidly. The amount of mercury which various authors advocated to be used ranged from 3 to 10 cc.1 As a result of the observations of my colleagues and me over the past three years, during which time 441 patients were intubated, we attempted to make certain observations and conclusions regarding the optimum amount of mercury that should be used in any type of case.

In 1589 Galileo demonstrated that bodies of different weights fell with the same velocity. He proved this important point by the simple expedient

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