[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.159.140.188. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
July 1950

INFLUENCE OF VAGOTOMY ON PEPTIC ULCER, GASTRIC ACIDITY AND MOTILITYA Follow-Up Study on Sixty-Eight Patients and Evaluation of the Operation

Author Affiliations

Fellow in Surgery, Mayo Foundation ROCHESTER, MINN.
From the Division of Surgery, Mayo Clinic.

Arch Surg. 1950;61(1):86-94. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1950.01250020089010
Abstract

ON DEC. 6, 1946, one of us (Walters) presented before this society a paper on the anatomic distribution of the vagus nerves at the lower end of the esophagus, with a brief report on 66 patients who had undergone vagotomy at the Mayo Clinic. Thirty-three of the operations had been performed by one of us (Walters) and 33 by other surgeons. In that paper1 the following statements were made:

... because of the experimental evidence [Hartzel and Vanzant] that the changes in gastric acidity and motility after vagotomy may be only temporary, and because long experience with peptic ulcer makes us reserve our judgment concerning any operation until a large series of patients have been watched for many years, gastric neurectomy [vagotomy] is being performed at the Mayo Clinic in selected cases of peptic ulcer only. We think that the final report of this operation is not due for several

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×