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Article
July 1950

MASSIVE RESECTION OF THE SMALL INTESTINEReport of a Case

Author Affiliations

MADISON, WIS.

Arch Surg. 1950;61(1):123-130. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1950.01250020126014
Abstract

THE TERM "massive" when applied to resections of the small intestine has been defined1 as the removal of 6 feet 7 inches (200 cm.) or more of the intestine. Because of the fact that the human intestine has been reported2 to vary from about 10 feet (305 cm.) to 28 feet (853 cm.) depending on race, sex and individual diet, it becomes apparent that an estimation of the amount of bowel remaining is of much greater importance than a record of the amount removed. Koeberlé3 in 1880 reported perhaps the first massive resection, in which 6 feet 8 inches (203 cm.) was resected. In 1935 Haymond4 reviewed 257 cases collected from the literature, and he found that volvulus was the most common cause for massive intestinal resection, followed in descending order of frequency by strangulated hernia, mesenteric thrombosis, pelvic inflammatory disease, mesenteric derangement and abdominal injuries.

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