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Article
July 1950

MASSIVE HEMORRHAGE IN THE UPPER PART OF THE GASTROINTESTINAL TRACTEmphasis on the Atypical Type

Arch Surg. 1950;61(1):183-192. doi:10.1001/archsurg.1950.01250020186019
Abstract

THE PERPLEXING problems of massive hemorrhage in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract have been a source of controversial discussion for many years.1 The issues have simmered down somewhat and are now chiefly concerned with the proper management of the age group over 50. Recent papers have cast doubts on the widely held concepts regarding the advisability of surgical intervention in the elderly.2 Most of the previous studies made on massive hemorrhage in the upper part of the gastrointestinal tract came out of public institutions, mixed services and coroners' office reports, in which other factors such as family indifference, ignorance, poor housing and malnutrition may have played a part in the high death rates usually quoted.

A review of cases of massive bleeding in a private hospital with a qualified staff might reveal differences in the end results of therapy. The records of Swedish Hospital, a private

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